Spaghetti carbonara

Posted on feb 4, 2015

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Ingredients: (serves 4)
400 g. spaghetti
120 g. cheek, Bacon (non smoked)
4 eggs (only the yolk)
4 handfuls of grated pecorino romano
salt
ground black pepper, to crush at the moment

PREPARATION
Put the chopped bacon into a pan without oil, let it crisps slowly, once is done take it out of its grease .
Cook the spaghetti in abundant salty water.
Beat the eggs with the pecorino cheese in a proper bowl to contain the pasta, and put the grease of the bacon into the eggs, ad just a little bit of salt,( the bacon is salty)
Drain the pasta, and pour it into the bowl with the eggs, and mix it quickly , in this way the eggs will cook amalgamating with the other ingredients and they will turn into a soft cream without clots, dust it with some ground black pepper crushed at the moment
Serve the spaghetti immediately!

WINE PARING
A perfect wine to drink with carbonara is a local white wine named Frascati. I suggest the Frascati Superiore Luna Mater by Fontana Candida, the grapes are: Malvasia, Greco and Bombino, All native. If you prefer a wine made with international grapes I suggest a Chardonnay 100% also from Lazio Region, named Chalanchi di Vaiano by Paolo and Noemia D’Amico. Wen you return to Rome, if you wish, I can organize a wine tasting tour in the wine estate!
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SPAGHETTI CARBONARA HISTORY
The carbonara is a Roman recipe for sure, some people say is recent because we have only news beginning from the second postwar period, its origin is a bit controversial. There are different theories. Pasta seasoned with the products of the pastorizia, eggs and bacon or lard, were common food on the mountains nearby Rome. A second hypothesis says that the Roman innkeepers to feed the American soldiers, inspired by the idea that at breakfast they ate eggs and bacon, have proposed them the seasoned pasta with these ingredients. The third hypothesis says that the pasta carbonara was prepared in the Roman inns since a long time. The name carbonara comes from the word carbone, that in Italian means coal, because of the black pepper that gives the dark color.